My new love- MCT Oil

A few months we were visiting some of friends and having dinner and all of a sudden this orange bottle appears and it is being poured over salad. I looked at it and said what is this? I was told it was MCT Oil and it is wonderful for your body. I looked at it and thought there is no way I am going to pour it on my salad, as I am a ranch dressing person! So I bought the capsules, read the bottle,  it said take with food, no red flags and away I went with my new supplement. I started taking them every so often, because I trusted the person telling me about it and it contains coconut oil and we have all heard how good that is for you.

Last week I started running out of the capsules of the bottle that I have had for probably 6 months and went to 3 stores trying to find them again with no success. I also thought I would start searching to find more information about MCT Oil and how good it really is for you before I wear my self out trying to find those gel colored capsules. Here is some information I have found. https://draxe.com/mct-oil/

Pretty impressive I would say! So yes, MCT Oil is something I will continue to take on a regular basis. It has those wonderful words I love to hear, speeds up metabolism, promotes healthy gut, removes joint pain and so much more!

Would help if I gave the recipe!!

Talk about busy – I was so excited to tell about these cookies, I forgot the recipe. Here it is!! Let me know how you like them.
http://allrecipes.com/recipe/218056/easy-roasted-almond-cookies/print/?recipeType=Recipe&servings=6

Easy Roasted Almond Cookies

Going through some old emails I found this a link that I had saved for Easy Roasted Almond Cookies. I had sent it to my aunt who makes an amazing almond cake that is low carb and so healthy. This recipe I found on allrecipes and told my aunt how great they were. I can’t wait to make them again!  It always amazes me that I make an absolutely delicious recipe and then don’t make it again for years. I think, if it was so great, why have I not made it again? I guess that is life in the world of wife, mom and business woman. Just to busy!!!

 

Published in: on May 23, 2017 at 6:57 am  Leave a Comment  

Coke and Pepsi used as Pesticides

india-coke-pesticide

Farmers in India in the state of Chhattisgarh use coke and pepsi as pesticides because it’s cheaper than pesticides and gets the job done just as well. Video below.

Pepsi and Coca-Cola strongly disagree that their products can be used as pesticides because they say there is nothing in the drinks that can be used as pest control. But, the Farmers in the Durg, Rajnandgaon and Dhamtari districts of Chhattisgarh disagree and have successfully used Pepsi and Coke to protect their rice plantations against pests. And if you remember correctly Rajnandgaon recently grew a world record in rice production without the use of GMOs. We know using cola as pesticide isn’t exactly 100% natural or organic but surely it must be safer than traditional poisons.

This is a trend that is seen across other parts of India, with farmers using other Indian brands of colas too. The practice of using soft drinks instead of pesticides, which are up to 10 times more expensive, is gaining so much popularity that sales of soft drinks have increased dramatically in many villages. Farmers say the use of pesticides can cost them about 70 rupees ($1.50) an acre. By comparison, if they mix up a bottle of Pepsi or Coke with water and spray it on their crops it costs 55-60 rupees less per acre. When you multiply these savings the farmers are noticing a significant change in earnings and at the same time are noticing the lack of pesticide use is keeping their soil rich. Agricultural specialist Devendra Sharma says some farmers actually think that the drinks are the same as pesticides, but he explains it’s most likely because of the sugar syrups and when they are poured on crops they attract ants which in turn feed on the larva of insects. Pretty interesting huh? How many of you think this is a better idea than pesticide usage?

Published in: on May 20, 2014 at 6:53 am  Leave a Comment  
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9 Reasons to Keep Coconut Oil in Your Bathroom

9 Reasons To Keep Coconut Oil In Your Bathroom

  1. Oil Pulling – Have you swished with coconut oil? Oil pulling is a traditional way to cleanse the mouth of bacteria. Start your day with oil pulling by swishing a teaspoon of coconut oil in your mouth. Try to swish for at least 10 minutes. If you can, swish up to 20 minutes. Learn more about oil pulling here.
  2. Wash Your Face. It’s called oil cleansing and it’s amazing! It may sound strange but oil can actually help clean your face. I wash my face with coconut oil almost every night. Learn more about oil cleansing here.
  3. Shave Your Legs . That’s right! Coconut oil is a girls best friend when it comes to shaving. If you want baby soft legs, rub a small amount of coconut oil on your legs before shaving.
  4. Hair Treatment – Coconut oil helps reduce protein loss when used as a pre or post treatment. I swing towards pre-treating my hair by adding a 1/2 tablespoon of coconut oil to the roots  and work the oil down to the ends. I then leave the coconut oil on for an hour before rinsing.
  5. Skin moisturizer. I use whipped coconut oil body butter almost daily! Coconut oil is known to help reduce scaring, stretch marks and prevent sagging skin. It’s a natural “miracle” cream! Try my whipped coconut oil body butter here.
  6.  Rash and Burn Cream. Coconut oil helps to sooth rashes and burns. I’ve witnessed this when my children have had diaper rashes. A small dab of coconut oil has always helped to reduce and even eliminate diaper rash.
  7. Eye Makeup Remover. Another wonderful reason to have coconut oil on hand in the bathroom is for removing makeup! Wash your face and then use coconut oil to remove the remaining eye makeup.
  8. Cuticle Treatment. Coconut oil does wonders for your nails! Massage your finger nails and toe nails with it as often as you like to help keep rugged cuticles tame. The anti-fungal properties of coconut oil are also helpful for keeping  toes clear of fungal infections.
  9. Frizz Tamer. Coconut oil is my go-to when I need to tame my daughters beautifully wild hair. Only use a small amount though. Too much coconut oil will leave your hair with an oily look.
Published in: on May 9, 2014 at 9:33 am  Leave a Comment  

Uses for 4 Essential Oils

Photo: Endless uses!

Published in: on March 28, 2014 at 3:29 pm  Leave a Comment  
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How to Read a Food Label

Published in: on March 4, 2014 at 8:25 am  Leave a Comment  

Build Your Own Smoothie

Build Your Own Smoothie

Published in: on February 22, 2014 at 8:53 am  Leave a Comment  

FDA Pulls Antibacterial Soaps

Five Reasons Why You Should Probably Stop Using Antibacterial Soap

As the FDA recently noted, antibacterial products are no more effective than soap and water, and could be dangerous

                                                                                          By Joseph Stromberg                                                                 
smithsonianmag.com                                                                                                                                            January 3, 2014                

                    

 A few weeks ago, the FDA announced a bold new position on antibacterial soap: Manufacturers have to show that it’s both safe and more effective than simply washing with conventional soap and water, or they have to take it off the shelves in the next few years.
 

About 75 percent of liquid antibacterial soaps and 30 percent of bars use a chemical called triclosan as an active ingredient. The drug, which was originally used strictly in hospital settings, was adopted by manufacturers of soaps and other home products during the 1990s, eventually ballooning into an industry that’s worth an estimated $1 billion. Apart from soap, we’ve begun putting the chemical in wipes, hand gelscutting boards, mattress pads and all sorts of home items as we try our best to eradicate any trace of bacteria from our environment.

But triclosan’s use in home over-the-counter products was never fully evaluated by the FDA—incredibly, the agency was ordered to produce a set of guidelines for the use of triclosan in home products way back in 1972, but only published its final draft on December 16 of last year. Their report, the product of decades of research, notes that the costs of antibacterial soaps likely outweigh the benefits, and forces manufacturers to prove otherwise.

Bottom line: Manufacturers have until 2016 to do so, or pull their products from the shelves. But we’re here to tell you that you probably shouldn’t wait that long to stop using antibacterial soaps. Here’s our rundown of five reasons why that’s the case:

1. Antibacterial soaps are no more effective than conventional soap and water. As mentioned in the announcement, 42 years of FDA research—along with countless independent studies—have produced no evidence that triclosan provides any health benefits as compared to old-fashioned soap.

“I suspect there are a lot of consumers who assume that by using an antibacterial soap product, they are protecting themselves from illness, protecting their families,” Sandra Kweder, deputy director of the FDA’s drug center, told the AP. “But we don’t have any evidence that that is really the case over simple soap and water.”

Manufacturers say they do have evidence of triclosan’s superior efficacy, but the disagreement stems from the use of different sorts of testing methods. Tests that strictly measure the number of bacteria on a person’s hands after use do show that soaps with triclosan kill slightly more bacteria than conventional ones.

But the FDA wants data that show that this translates into an actual clinical benefit, such as reduced infection rates. So far, analyses of the health benefits don’t show any evidence that triclosan can reduce the transmission of respiratory or gastrointestinal infections. This might be due to the fact that antibacterial soaps specifically target bacteria, but not the viruses that cause the majority of seasonal colds and flus.

2. Antibacterial soaps have the potential to create antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The reason that the FDA is making manufacturers prove these products’ efficacy is because of a range of possible health risks associated with triclosan, and bacterial resistance is first on the list.

Heavy use of antibiotics can cause resistance, which results from a small subset of a bacteria population with a random mutation that allows it to survive exposure to the chemical. If that chemical is used frequently enough, it’ll kill other bacteria, but allow this resistant subset to proliferate. If this happens on a broad enough scale, it can essentially render that chemical useless against the strain of bacteria.

This is currently a huge problem in medicine—the World Health Organization calls it a “threat to global health security.” Some bacteria species (most notably, MRSA) have even acquired resistance to several different drugs, complicating efforts to control and treat infections as they spread. Health officials say that further research is needed before we can say that triclosan is fueling resistance, but several studies have hinted at the possibility.

            <img src=”http://thumbs.media.smithsonianmag.com//filer/f4/06/f406ff53-15e7-4223-8f7c-0e49f3c475a5/soap_bar.jpg__800x450_q85_crop_upscale.jpg” alt=””                

3. The soaps could act as endocrine disruptors.  A number of studies have found that, in rats, frogs and other animals, triclosan appears to interfere with the body’s regulation of thyroid hormone, perhaps because it chemically resembles the hormone closely enough that it can bind to its receptor sites. If this is the case in humans, too, there are worries that it could lead to problems such as infertility, artificially-advanced early puberty, obesity and cancer.

These same effects haven’t yet been found in humans, but the FDA calls the animal studies “a concern”—and notes that, given the minimal benefits of long-term triclosan use, it’s likely not worth the risk. 

4. The soaps might lead to other health problems, too. There’s evidence that children with prolonged exposure to triclosan have a higher chance of developing allergies, including peanut allergies and hay fever. Scientists speculate that this could be a result of reduced exposure to bacteria, which could be necessary for proper immune system functioning and development.

Another study found evidence that triclosan interfered with muscle contractions in human cells, as well as muscle activity in live mice and minnows. This is especially concerning given other findings that the chemical can penetrate the skin and enter the bloodstream more easily than originally thought. A 2008 survey, for instance, found triclosan in the urine of 75 percent of people tested.

5. Antibacterial soaps are bad for the environment. When we use a lot of triclosan in soap, that means a lot of triclosan gets flushed down the drain. Research has shown that small quantities of the chemical can persist after treatment at sewage plants, and as a result, USGS surveys have frequently detected it in streams and other bodies of water. Once in the environment, triclosan can disrupt algae’s ability to perform photosynthesis.

The chemical is also fat-soluble—meaning that it builds up in fatty tissues—so scientists are concerned that it can biomagnify, appearing at greater levels in the tissues of animals higher up the food chain, as the triclosan of all the plants and animals below them is concentrated. Evidence of this possibility was turned up in 2009, when surveys of bottlenose dolphins off the coast of South Carolina and Florida found concerning levels of the chemical in their blood.

What Should You Do?

If you’re planning on giving up antibacterial soap—like Johnson & Johnson, Kaiser Permanente and several other companies have recently done—you have a couple options.

One is a non-antibiotic hand sanitizer, like Purell, which don’t contain any triclosan and simply kill both bacteria and viruses with good old-fashioned alcohol. Because the effectiveness of hand-washing depends on how long you wash for, a quick squirt of sanitizer might be more effective when time is limited.

Outside of hospitals, though, the CDC recommends the time-tested advice you probably heard as a child: wash your hands with conventional soap and water. That’s because while alcohol from hand sanitizer kills bacteria, it doesn’t actually remove dirt or anything else you may have touched. But a simple hand wash should do the trick. The water doesn’t need to be hot, and you’re best off scrubbing for about 30 seconds to get properly clean.

 

Published in: on January 14, 2014 at 11:22 am  Leave a Comment  

10 Health Benefits of Virgin Coconut Oil

Published in: on December 11, 2013 at 8:46 am  Leave a Comment  
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