Toxins in Beauty and Skin Products

Published in: on October 20, 2013 at 7:07 am  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , ,

Kashi GoLean Cereal full of Pesticides.

Despite being highly processed and not at all healthy, consumers still purchase box after box of “natural” and organic breakfast cereals thinking it’s good for them.

This is because consumers get so easily excited about a label with just one or two ingredients and no chemicals or preservatives, but rarely seem to consider how those ingredients are sourced or processed – which is many times more important!

Kashi GoLean, an extremely popular brand of “natural” cereal recently got slapped for abusing this misplaced consumer trust by The Cornucopia Institute’s Cereal Crimes report.

 

A box of Kashi GoLean cereal was purchased from a Whole Foods in Boston and sent to an accredited lab for testing.

The findings?

The cereal was 100% GMO and had pesticide residues despite having “natural” on the label.

Kashi responded by saying the information was inaccurate and misleading because it was not based on a formal scientific analysis of Kashi products.

Huh??

How can testing a box of Kashi cereal at an accredited lab not be scientifically accurate?

Oh wait, I know!  It’s because Kashi wasn’t funding the testing behind the scenes so they could stealthily control the results that were reported, right?

Kashi’s arrogant and lame response is typical of giant food manufacturers like Kellogg, which owns Kashi, who are used to being able to claim just about anything they want about their products and get away with it.

Even more lame, when it became apparent that Kashi wasn’t going to be able to spin its way out of the PR nightmare, it was announced that Kashi would be 100% GMO free by …

2015!

Don’t worry guys.  Keep on eating that GMO, pesticide laced cereal for just a few more years and we’ll be sure to get our act together and get rid of them before you’re in a wheelchair!   And, if we’re lucky, you will forget all about this messy public relations snafu in a few short months so we won’t really have to change at all!

The fact is, Kellogg supports GMOs for use in “natural” products. According to the grassroots organization GMO Free USAKellogg is actively working against requiring the labeling of GMOs having contributed $33,000 so far to propaganda campaigns to defeat it.

Best not to trust food companies with your most important meal of the day and go barcode free with your breakfast choices.   The soaked cereals of traditional cultures are an excellent choice or, if you really need a cold breakfast cereal, make a truly healthy one yourself so that it doesn’t contain the extruded, denatured, allergenic cereal grains of the heavily processed, boxed variety that are falsely promoted on the label as somehow healthy because they are natural or organic.

 

Sarah, The Healthy Home Economist

Published in: on October 5, 2013 at 7:39 am  Leave a Comment  

Detox Your Body

Here are some great FOODS FOR DETOXING various regions of the body. I juice fast for 3 days at the beginning of every season (we will lead the fall fast next weekend) one day of every week, and maintain an alkaline diet. Lemon water, apple cider vinegar, green smoothies, turmeric, cayenne pepper, water, lymphatic drainage massage, colonics, meditation, yoga, hiking, walking, oil pulling all helps me. What do you do to cleanse and detox?

Published in: on October 4, 2013 at 6:41 am  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , , ,

Beaver Butt in Our Food?

Beaver butts emit goo used in vanilla flavored foods

Published October 02, 2013

FoxNews.com
  • beavernatgeo.jpg

    Beavers are among the largest of the rodents. (Joel Sartore/National Geographic)

Next time you pick up a vanilla candy, think twice. A chemical compound used in vanilla flavored foods and scents comes from the butt of a beaver.

Castoreum comes from a beaver’s castor sacs, located between the pelvis and base of the tail. Due to its proximity to the anal glands, the slimy brown substance is often mixed with gland secretions and urine.

“I lift up the animal’s tail,” Joanne Crawford, a wildlife ecologist at Southern Illinois University told National Geographic. “I’m like, ‘Get down there, and stick your nose near its bum.'”

“People think I’m nuts,” she added. “I tell them, ‘Oh, but it’s beavers; it smells really good.'”

Beavers use the brown slime, often compared to a thinner version of molasses, to mark their territory. The musky, vanilla scent is attributed to a beaver’s diet of bark and leaves.

Manufacture have been using castoreum as an additive in foods and perfumes for at least 80 years, according to a 2007 study in the International Journal of Toxicology.

But getting a beaver to emit castoreum is not easy. Foodies are willing to “milk” the animals in order to get their hands on the gooey substance.

“You can milk the anal glands so you can extract the fluid,” Crawford said. “You can squirt [castoreum] out. It’s pretty gross.”

Only 292-pounds per year is collected because the milking method is unpleasant for all parties involved.

And the worst part? The FDA-approved castoreum is not required to be listed as an ingredient on food items. Manufacturers may list “natural flavoring” instead.

Perhaps a bit too natural for us.

Published in: on October 2, 2013 at 3:07 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , ,

What To Do For Your Gut After Antibiotics

 

z-pak meds

Antibiotics are truly a wonder of modern medicine.

Beginning with the discovery of penicillin by Alexander Fleming in 1928, the pure magic of antibiotics with their rapid resolution of bacterial infections of all kinds caused many in the medical profession to become completely enamored with the drug based approach to illness. By 1940, antibiotics had come into widespread use causing both doctors and people to gradually forget about tried and true techniques for preventing illness such as the age old remedy cod liver oil.

This change in the medical paradigm has led in recent decades to abuse of these magical meds and the growing threat of antibiotic resistant bacterial strains. It has also caused in an epidemic of people with compromised gut function due to an imbalanced intestinal environment resulting from excessive exposure to antibiotics via industrially produced foods, medicine, and more recently, groundwater contamination.

 

While antibiotics clearly have their place in treating life threatening bacterial infections, their overuse has led to a plethora of modern day health challenges and autoimmune disease.

While complete avoidance of all antibiotic exposure would be the ideal, it is simply not practical in the majority of cases. Sometimes, antibiotics are necessary and when such a situation arises, it is imperative to protect the gastrointestinal tract from fungal or yeast overgrowth during treatment and to replenish beneficial gut bacteria when the course of antibiotics is complete.

While antibiotics effectively kill both pathogenic and beneficial bacteria with the exception of antibiotic-resistant species of streptococcus and other strains, they do not affect the many forms of yeast such as Candida albicans naturally found in the body in a nondominant role.

As beneficial bacteria lining the gut wall are eliminated, yeast like Candida albicans has the opportunity to overgrow and become dominant by attaching itself to the gut wall. Once attached to the gut wall, yeast has the ability to create lesions in the cell membranes. This can lead to the syndrome referred to as “leaky gut”, which increases the likelihood of foreign proteins entering the bloodstream resulting in inflammation, food intolerances, a myriad of digestive problems, autoimmune disease, and other associated imbalances.

If you or a loved one find yourself in a situation where antibiotics are critically necessary and cannot be avoided with holistic therapies, the following recommendations for support during and after antibiotic treatment can help minimize the damage to the gut environment and quickly rebuild gut flora at the conclusion of treatment.

These recommendations are provided to patients of the clinic Biodynamic Wellness which specializes in helping people recover and maintain optimal balance of the intestinal environment to encourage vibrant health free of chronic disease stemming from a compromised gut. The owner of Biodynamic Wellness, Kim Schuette CN, generously gave permission to share the recommendations listed below.

Diet During and After Antibiotics

  • Include generous servings of lacto-fermented dairy and cultured vegetables during and after antibiotic treatment. One tablespoon to half a cup of yogurt, kefir, kim-chi, sauerkraut, beet kvaas, etc. two to three times daily is advisable.
  • Include gelatin rich foods such as homemade meat stocks and bone broths daily along with abundant vegetables, animal fats, coconut oil and skate or cod liver oil. A gelatin supplement can also be used to add further gelatin to homemade soups and sauces.
  •  Avoid all refined carbohydrates and fruit juices.

Supplemental Support During Antibiotics

  • Saccharomyces boulardii: one capsule twice daily to discourage yeast overgrowth during antibiotic treatment when beneficial gut flora are being compromised.

Supplemental Support After Antibiotics

  • Saccharomyces boulardii: one capsule twice daily to discourage yeast overgrowth during the gut flora recovery phase – continue for 30 days.

Sarah, The Healthy Home Economist

Published in: on September 27, 2013 at 8:05 am  Leave a Comment  

Top Foods to Eat

        
 
 

<!–

–>

Some foods naturally contain disease-fighting, health promoting properties, while others contain elements that may hinder your health goals. Find out information that may surprise you with these helpful food facts.

 
Asparagus

Asparagus

  • Asparagus is high in glutathione, an important anticarcinogen
  • It also contains rutin, which protects small blood vessels from rupturing and may protect against radiation
  • Asparagus is a good source of vitamins A, C and E, B-complex vitamins, potassium and zinc

 

Avocado

Avocado

  • Avocados are rich in monounsaturated fat, which is easily burned for energy.
  • An avocado has more than twice as much potassium as a banana.
  • For a delicious, creamy salad dressing, mix together avocado and fresh carrot juice.

 

bananas

Bananas

  • You don’t need to eat bananas     for the potassium! (Although it is present in bananas, potassium is the predominant nutrient among most all fruits and vegetables.)
  • Bananas are high in sugar,     so they should not be eaten if you have blood sugar problems.
  • Don’t eat bananas on an empty stomach; combining them with a bit of protein will help to normalize the insulin response caused by the sugar in the banana.
  • Green-tipped bananas are better for your health than over-ripe bananas.
  • On a side note: Because bananas are so popular, rainforests are often destroyed to make way for banana plantations.

 

Beet Greens/Root

Beet Greens/Root

  • Beet greens contain notable amounts of calcium, iron, magnesium and phosphorus
  • They also contain vitamins A, B-complex and C
  • Beet roots are high in carbohydrate levels and should therefore be used sparingly

 

Broccoli

Broccoli

  • Broccoli contains twice the vitamin C of an orange
  • It has almost as much calcium as whole milk–and the calcium is better absorbed
  • It contains selenium, a mineral that has been found to have anti-cancer and anti-viral properties
  • Broccoli is a modest source of vitamin A and alpha-tocopherol vitamin E
  • It also has antioxidant properties

 

Celery

Celery

  • Celery is the best vegetable source of naturally occurring sodium.
  • It is high in potassium.
  • The high water content in celery makes it ideal for vegetable juicing.
  • As an easy way to reduce grains in your diet, spread peanut butter on celery rather than bread.

Back to top


Cilantro

Cilantro

  • Cilantro may be useful to treat urinary tract infections
  • Both the leaves and seeds aid digestion, relieve intestinal gas, pain and distention
  • They also treat nausea, soothe inflammation, rheumatic pain, headaches, coughs and mental stress
  • Cilantro is a member of the carrot family

Back to top


Chicory

Chicory

  • Chicory contains inulin, which helps diabetics regulate their blood sugar levels
  • Chicory is closely related to lettuce and dandelion but is a member of the sunflower family
  • It may be cleansing to the liver and gallbladder
  • Chicory is beneficial for digestion, the circulatory system and the blood
  • Chicory leaves are a good source of calcium, vitamin A and potassium

Back to top


Chinese Cabbage

Chinese Cabbage

  • Chinese cabbage has anti-inflammatory properties
  • It is an excellent source of folic acid
  • Chinese cabbage is low in calories and low in sodium
  • It is also high in vitamin A and a good source of potassium

Back to top


Dandelion Greens

Dandelion Greens

  • Dandelion is beneficial to digestion and is an antiviral that may be useful in the treatment of AIDS and herpes
  • It may also be useful in treating jaundice, cirrhosis, edema due to high blood pressure, gout, eczema and acne
  • Dandelion is also used to treat and prevent breast and lung tumors and premenstrual bloating
  • Dandelion greens are high in vitamin A in the form of antioxidant carotenoid and vitamin C
  • They also contain calcium and potassium
  • Dandelion root contains inulin, which lowers blood sugar in diabetics

Back to top


Fennel

Fennel

  • Fennel contains the antioxidant flavonoid quercetin
  • This herb is anticarcinogenic and can be useful for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy or radiation
  • Fennel can be useful for indigestion and spasms of the digestive tract
  • It also helps expel phlegm from the lungs

Back to top


Green Beans

Green Beans

  • Fresh beans contain vitamin A, B-complex vitamins, calcium and potassium
  • Green beans are diuretic and may be used to treat diabetes
  • A fresh bean should snap crisply and feels velvety to the touch

Back to top


Jicama

Jicama

  • Jicama is low in sodium and high in potassium
  • It has a slightly sweet flesh that’s on the order of water chestnuts, but crunchier
  • Due to their high carbohydrate content, they should be used sparingly

Back to top


Kale

Kale

  • Kale eases lung congestion and is beneficial to the stomach, liver and immune system
  • It contains lutein and zeaxanthin, which protect the eyes from macular degeneration
  • It also contains indole-3-carbinol, which may protect against colon cancer
  • Kale is an excellent source of calcium, iron, vitamins A and C, and chlorophyll

Back to top


Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi

  • Kohlrabi, which belongs to the cabbage family, is an excellent source of vitamin C and potassium
  • It is also high in fiber
  • Kohlrabi helps to stabilize blood sugar and is therefore useful hypoglycemia and diabetes
  • It can also be effective against edema, candida and viral conditions

Back to top


Mustard Greens

Mustard Greens

  • Mustard greens are an excellent anticancer vegetable
  • They may also be beneficial for colds, arthritis or depression
  • While mustard greens sold in the United States are relatively mild in flavor, some mustard green varieties, especially those in Asia, can be as hot as a jalapeno pepper depending on their mustard oil content

Back to top


Onions

Onions

  • Onions are an excellent antioxidant, and they contain anti-allergy, antiviral and antihistamine properties.
  • Sulfur compounds in onions help to detoxify the body.
  • Onions aid in cellular repair.
  • Onions are a rich source of quercetin, a potent antioxidant.
  • To obtain the maximum nutritional benefits, onions should be eaten raw or lightly steamed

Back to top


Parsley

Parsley

  • Parsley is useful as a digestive aid
  • It helps to purify the blood and stimulate the bowels
  • Parsley is an anticarcinogen
  • It contains three times as much vitamin C as oranges, and twice as much iron as spinach
  • Parsley contains vitamin A and is a good source of copper and manganese
  • For a natural breath freshener, try a sprig of parsley

Back to top


Peanut Butter

Peanut Butter

  • When buying peanut butter, only buy organic varieties.
  • Non-organic peanut butters are high in pesticides and fungus and contain aflatoxin, a potent carcinogenic mold.
  • To increase the protein in peanut butter (peanuts have about the same amount of protein as soy), Brewer’s yeast can be mixed in. This is especially useful for vegetarian

Back to top


Peanuts

Peanuts

  • Peanuts contain beneficial protein, but many people are allergic to them and find them hard to digest.
  • They also contain aflatoxin, a carcinogenic, which may explain why peanut farmers have been found     to have disproportionately high rates of cancer.
  • Peanuts are high in fungus and, often, pesticides.     They do not contain any omega-3, which can contribute to distorting your omega-6:omega-3 ratio.
  • The peanut is actually a legume, not a nut (which is why they are often roasted).
  • Peanuts contain about the same amount of protein as soy and are low in starchy carbohydrates.
  • Did you know? George Washington Carver was largely responsible for popularizing the peanut as a food in America.

Back to top


Pumpkin Seeds

Pumpkin Seeds

  • Pumpkin seeds are high in zinc, which is good for the prostate and building the immune system.
  • They also contain fatty acids that kill parasites.
  • Raw pumpkin seeds contain essential fatty acids and beneficial proteins.
  • For maximum nutritional benefits, seeds should be eaten raw.
  • Roasted seeds contain damaged fat that can lead to plaque in the arteries

Back to top


Radishes

Radishes

  • Radishes have antibacterial and anti-fungal properties
  • They are a member of the cabbage family
  • Radishes contain vitamin C, potassium and other trace minerals
  • Grown in Egypt since at least 2780 B.C., radishes were originally black

Back to top


Sweet Potato

Sweet Potato

  • Sweet potatoes are an excellent source of carotenoid antioxidants
  • They contain calcium, are high in vitamins A and C and contain thiamine
  • Be careful: eating too many may cause abdominal swelling and indigestion
  • Sweet potatoes are also high in sugar and therefore should be used sparingly
  • Sweet potatoes are not related to the potato nor the yam–they are actually a member of the morning glory family

Back to top


Tomatoes

Tomatoes

  • Tomatoes are rich in lycopene, flavonoids and other phytochemicals with anticarcinogenic properties
  • Tomatoes are an excellent source of vitamin C (the vitamin C is most concentrated in the     jelly-like substance that surrounds the seeds)
  • They also contain vitamin A and B-complex vitamins, potassium and phosphorus
  • A tomato grown in a hothouse has half the vitamin C content as a vine-ripened tomato

Zucchini (Summer Squash)

Zucchini (Summer Squash)

  • Zucchini and other summer squash varieties contain vitamins A and C
  • They also contain potassium and calcium
  • The flavor of zucchini is best when it is less than six inches long
  • Zucchinis can grow as large as baseball bats but have little flavor when they reach this size
Published in: on September 25, 2013 at 7:22 am  Leave a Comment  

Chobani Yogurt Being Pulled From Shelves

NEW YORK — Chobani is pulling some of its Greek yogurt from supermarket shelves after hearing of “swelling or bloating” in cups.

The company said it has investigated and found a type of mold commonly found in dairy that may be to blame.

Chobani said the affected product came from its Idaho facility and represents less than 5 percent of its total production. The company has been working with retailers to remove and replace containers with the code 16-012 and expiration dates Sept. 11 to Oct. 7.

Chobani, which is based in New Berlin, N.Y., did not say how many of its cups or what varieties were affected. The effort was voluntary and it is not issuing a formal recall.

A representative for Kroger, the nation’s largest traditional supermarket operator, said Chobani issued a product withdrawal Friday. “It was not a food safety issue,” Kroger spokesman Keith Dailey said in an email.

On Tuesday, Chobani was responding to people who were complaining about their yogurt cups on Twitter. One person described her cup as “unnervingly fizzy,” another said the cups were like “yogurt soup” and another said it tasted like “wine.”

Yet another person said the strawberry flavor they bought tasted “really old.”

Chobani, which says it uses only high-quality, natural ingredients, has grown rapidly since it was founded in 2005.

Greek yogurt in general has surged in popularity as well, with fans saying they prefer its thicker consistency and relatively higher protein content when compared with the sweeter yogurt varieties that have long been sold in American supermarkets.

The private company had an estimated $244 million in revenue in 2010, according to S&P Capital IQ.

Chobani says customers with the affected code dates should contact its customer service team at care(at)chobani.com to get replacement products.

Published in: on September 5, 2013 at 11:19 am  Leave a Comment  

Top 10 Cancer Causing Foods

☠ Top 10 Most Unhealthy, Cancer-Causing Foods ☠ ►http://www.realfarmacy.com/top-10-most-unhealthy-cancer-causing-foods/

Published in: on August 11, 2013 at 2:46 pm  Leave a Comment  

Things to Replenish Electrolytes Naturally

I posted this a while back. but I have been getting a lot of messages about REPLENISHING YOUR ELECTROLYTES. Here are some ideas. What do you do?

Published in: on August 2, 2013 at 8:07 pm  Leave a Comment  

Reflexology Chart- Where is your pain? Your feet can relate!

Here's an easy REFLEXOLOGY chart. I have regular reflexology sessions, and find it SO beneficial. An hour massage on my feet from a qualified practitioner and I feel amazing. I am often tender in #14 as I had adrenal fatigue due to all of the stress last year. Really interesting stuff. What has your experience been with this?

Published in: on July 24, 2013 at 8:17 am  Leave a Comment