My new love- MCT Oil

A few months we were visiting some of friends and having dinner and all of a sudden this orange bottle appears and it is being poured over salad. I looked at it and said what is this? I was told it was MCT Oil and it is wonderful for your body. I looked at it and thought there is no way I am going to pour it on my salad, as I am a ranch dressing person! So I bought the capsules, read the bottle,  it said take with food, no red flags and away I went with my new supplement. I started taking them every so often, because I trusted the person telling me about it and it contains coconut oil and we have all heard how good that is for you.

Last week I started running out of the capsules of the bottle that I have had for probably 6 months and went to 3 stores trying to find them again with no success. I also thought I would start searching to find more information about MCT Oil and how good it really is for you before I wear my self out trying to find those gel colored capsules. Here is some information I have found. https://draxe.com/mct-oil/

Pretty impressive I would say! So yes, MCT Oil is something I will continue to take on a regular basis. It has those wonderful words I love to hear, speeds up metabolism, promotes healthy gut, removes joint pain and so much more!

This Will make You Never Eat ground Turkey Again.

The Consumer Magazine is coming out in June and this is a featured article. It is sickening! Be Prepared. One more thing as we try and stay Healthy in Unhealthy World!     

Consumer Reports investigation: Talking turkey

Our new tests show reasons for concern

Consumer Reports magazine: June 2013
 
From barn to burger  |  A need for stricter limits  |  What you can do
 In our first-ever lab analysis of ground turkey bought at retail stores nationwide, more than half of the packages of raw ground meat and patties tested positive for fecal bacteria. Some samples harbored other germs, including salmonella and staphylococcus aureus, two of the leading causes of foodborne illness in the U.S. Overall, 90 percent of the samples had one or more of the five bacteria for which we tested.

Adding to the concern, almost all of the disease-causing organisms in our 257 samples proved resistant to one or more of the antibiotics commonly used to fight them. Turkeys (and other food animals, including chickens and pigs) are given antibiotics to treat acute illness; but healthy animals may also get drugs daily in their food and water to boost their rate of weight gain and to prevent disease. Many of the drugs are similar to antibiotics important in human medicine.

That practice, especially prevalent at large feedlots and mass-production facilities, is speeding the growth of drug-resistant superbugs, a serious health concern. People sickened by those bacteria might need to try several antibiotics before one succeeds. (Related: Read “Has Your Steak Been Mechanically Tenderized?” That report details a process that can drive bacteria like the deadly pathogen E. coli O157:H7 from the surface deep into the center of the meat.)

Among our findings:

  • Sixty-nine percent of ground-turkey samples harbored enterococcus, and 60 percent harbored Escherichia coli. Those bugs are associated with fecal contamination. About 80 percent of the enterococcus bacteria were resistant to three or more groups of closely related antibiotics (or classes), as were more than half of the E. coli.
  • Three samples were contaminated with methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which can cause fatal infections.
  • Ground turkey labeled “no antibiotics,” “organic,” or “raised without antibiotics” was as likely to harbor bacteria as products without those claims. (After all, even meat from organic birds can pick up bacteria during slaughter or processing.) The good news is that bacteria on those products were much less likely to be antibiotic-­resistant superbugs.
        
From barn to burger

Conventionally raised turkeys are fed mostly corn and soybean meal plus a vitamin and mineral supplement. They usually get FDA-approved antibiotics that may be given in low doses without a prescription. Before the birds are killed, antibiotics must be withdrawn to ensure that residues clear from the birds’ systems.

But harm may already have been done. Although the antibiotics eventually kill off vulnerable barnyard bugs, bacteria that are immune to their effects can flourish and spread. They can exchange genetic material with other bugs, further accelerating antibiotic resistance. And bacteria on turkeys can develop resistance to similar drugs that aren’t even given to turkeys.

Some bacteria that end up on ground turkey, including E. coli and staph aureus, can cause not only food poisoning but also urinary, bloodstream, and other infections.

Antibiotics aren’t allowed in turkeys labeled “organic,” “no antibiotics,” or  “raised without antibiotics.” (Sick birds may be treated, but they’re then sold to non­organic markets.) Organic birds must eat only certified organic feed and pasture, which means no genetically modified organisms; and production of those birds must not contribute to contamination of soil or water. Producers of organic and free-range turkeys must demonstrate to the Department of Agriculture that they’ve allowed birds “access to the outside,” though that phrase is not specifically defined and some birds may not venture outdoors.

Such steps are among the requirements for raising a food animal sustainably—without drugs and in a way that’s more healthful for animals and people.

Indeed, when we focused on antibiotic use, our analysis showed that bacteria on turkey labeled “no antibiotics” or “organic” were resistant to significantly fewer antibiotics than bacteria on conventional turkey. We also found much more resistance to classes of antibiotics approved for use in turkey production than to those not approved for such use. Consumers Union, the advocacy arm of Consumer Reports, believes that the FDA should ban all antibiotics in animal production except to treat illness.

 

A need for stricter limits

When any food animal is slaughtered, the bacteria that normally live in its gut without causing harm can wind up on its carcass. To limit contamination, federal law requires processors to create a Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point plan. For turkey processors, HACCP includes steps for washing and chilling carcasses throughout processing to reduce the growth of harmful bacteria and contamination of the finished product.

But HACCP doesn’t require eradication of harmful bacteria. In fact, salmonella is permitted in up to half of the ground-­turkey samples that the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) tests at processors’ plants. And bugs that remain can keep growing until the turkey is cooked.

                            The current salmonella standard isn’t strict enough. The USDA should allow no more than 12% contamination in ground-­turkey samples.    

In 2011 Cargill Value Added Meats Retail announced two voluntary recalls of a total of 36 million pounds of conventionally raised ground turkey—among the largest recalls of poultry meat in U.S. history—due to possible contamination with a resistant strain of salmonella Heidelberg. The superbug was traced to a Cargill establishment in Springdale, Ark. In all, 136 people fell ill during that outbreak, according to the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and one of those victims died.

“As we’ve publicly stated over the past year and a half, no stone was left unturned in our efforts to determine the originating source of salmonella Heidelberg associated with the ground-turkey recalls, yet to this day we do not know the origin of the bacteria linked to outbreak of illnesses,” said Mike Robach, vice president of corporate food safety and regulatory affairs for Cargill in Minneapolis. He provided a long list of steps that Cargill has taken since the outbreak to make its ground turkey safer.

In the wake of the recalls, the FSIS required all ground-poultry processors to review and update their safety procedures, paying special attention to the sanitation of equipment. The agency told us that it also plans to conduct a risk assessment of sal­monella and campylobacter (another food-poisoning bacterium) in ground-turkey products. The goal: a new standard for salmonella and, possibly, campylobacter.

Eight ground-turkey samples in our tests, conducted a year after the recalls, harbored salmonella that resisted three or more antibiotic classes. One of those samples came from a package of turkey processed at Cargill’s Springdale plant. It harbored a strain of salmonella Heidelberg that was not the outbreak strain but resisted the same antibiotics. Even a finding of the outbreak strain, the FSIS said, “likely would not trigger a specific follow-­up action by FSIS if steps were previously taken for the affected establishment to regain control of its operations.”

Consumers Union says the current salmonella standard isn’t strict enough, and is urging the USDA to allow no more than 12 percent contamination in ground-­turkey samples, a standard most of the industry already meets.

Any improvement will come too late for consumers such as Diana Goodpasture, 66, of Akron, Ohio. She was sickened with salmonella Heidelberg from ground turkey in June 2011 and was hospitalized for five days. “I’ve had complications ever since then,” she says. “I’m still seeing a gastroenterologist. I don’t know that I’ll ever be well.”

 

How resistant to antibiotics?

We determined whether samples of four bacteria isolated from our tested ground turkey could survive exposure to as many as 16 antibiotics at levels usually effective against those bugs. The antibiotics we tried differed with each bug and included ampicillin, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, and others often used to treat the illnesses those bacteria cause. Classes are groups of similar antibiotics. Three of the 39 samples of staph aureus harbored MRSA, a potentially deadly bacterium.

Bugs immune to drugs

Bacterium Samples tested Resisted one or more antibiotic classes Resisted three or more antibiotic classes
Enterococcus 178 177 144
Escherichia coli 155 135 82
Staphylococcus aureus 39 34 8
Salmonella 12 11 8

 

       

What you can do

                            Slip up during handling and you risk illness.    

Common slip-ups while handling or cooking ground turkey can put you at risk of illness. Although the bacteria we found are killed by thorough cooking, they can produce toxins that may not be destroyed by heat. Take the following precautions:

  • Buy turkey labeled “organic” or “no anti­biotics,” especially if it also has a “USDA Process Verified” label, which means that the USDA has confirmed that the producer is doing what it says. Organic and no-antibiotics brands in our tests were: Coastal Range Organics, Eberly, Giant Eagle Nature’s Basket, Harvestland, Kosher Valley, Nature’s Place, Nature’s Promise, Nature’s Rancher, Plainville Farms, Wegmans, Whole Foods, and Wild Harvest.
  • Consider other labels, such as “animal welfare approved” and “certified humane,” which mean that antibiotics were restricted to sick animals.
  • Be aware that “natural” meat is simply minimally processed, with no artificial ingredients or added color. It can come from an animal that ate antibiotics daily.
  • Know that no type of meat—whether turkey, chicken, beef, or pork—is risk free.
  • Buy meat just before checking out, and place it in a plastic bag to prevent leaks.
  • If you will cook meat within a couple of days, store it at 40° F or below. Otherwise, freeze it. (Note that freezing may not kill bacteria.)
  • Cook ground turkey to at least 165° F. Check with a meat thermometer. 
  • Wash hands and all surfaces after handling ground turkey.
  • Don’t return cooked meat to the plate that held it raw.
 Hours after she grilled a turkey burger for dinner in June 2011, Diana Goodpasture, 66, of Akron, Ohio, says she felt awful. “In the middle of the night, I woke up and I was sick,” she says. “I started to get an upset stomach and diarrhea, and then it just got progressively worse from there.”

Goodpasture, a van driver, says she thought she’d caught a stomach flu, so she stayed home for a few days. But the gastrointestinal symptoms and crampy abdominal pain worsened. “It got so bad that my kids said, ‘You have to go to the hospital,’ ” she recalls. Goodpasture was hospitalized at Akron General Medical Center for five days.

Tests showed that she’d fallen ill from salmonella Heidelberg. The leftover ground turkey she’d frozen after dinner also tested positive when analyzed by the Summit County Public Health Department.

Almost two years later, Goodpasture says she’s still not completely well. “It has really messed up my intestinal system. And from what I can tell, that’s just a lifetime thing I’m going to have to deal with,” she says. “It changed my whole life.”

 

The Make Up We Wear

I just read this article about the dangers in the make we wear. It is really sad all the different bad things they are putting in our products and food. Here is the article. You read it and decide and as always try and stay Healthy in an Unhealthy world!

 Spring is in bloom, and romance is in the air. But before puckering up, you’d  be wise to consider a new analysis, which found troubling levels of toxins in  cosmetics – particularly lipstick.

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley’s School of Public  Health detected lead, cadmium, chromium, aluminum and five other metals in 32  different lipsticks and lip glosses commonly found in drugstores and department  stores.  According to the report, which is published Thursday in the  journal Environmental Health Perspectives, some of these metals were  found at levels that could have long term health effects.

As far as I’m concerned, any level of any metal found in any makeup product  is too much – particularly in lipstick or lip gloss, which are easily ingested  and absorbed, bit by bit, by the person wearing them.  The researchers in  this study noted even average daily ingestion of lip makeup, defined as 24  milligrams per day, could result in excessive exposure to chromium, which has  been linked to stomach tumors. 

High use, defined as 87 milligrams per day, could overexpose users to metals  like manganese, which has been linked to nervous system toxicity.

It has long been acknowledged, but not necessarily well-studied, that  conventionally produced makeup contains numerous carcinogens, and might be  harmful to our health. And it’s not only adults who are at risk – don’t you know  a precarious toddler or young child just dying to try on mom’s lipstick, or get  all made up for Halloween or a school play? As the UC Berkeley study found, lead  is commonly found in lip makeup, and no level of lead exposure is considered  safe for children. It can lead to decreased bone and muscle growth, nervous  system and kidney damage, speech problems, and seizures.

Lead is undeniably dangerous to children, but ingesting or absorbing products  containing lead and other metals on a regular basis can’t be good for anyone.  The study focuses a lot on “acceptable” daily intake levels of these poisonous  substances – but why is any level that is more than zero considered acceptable  at all?

Like the cleaning products industry, which is largely unregulated by the U.S.  government and does not require manufacturers to disclose ingredients to  consumers, there are currently no U.S. standards for metal content in  cosmetics.

Interestingly, and as the study authors note, the European Union considers  any level of cadmium, chromium, and lead in cosmetics unacceptable. Why don’t  we?

As the so-called “health” establishment remains lax on protecting consumers  from the dangers of metals in makeup (and toxins in other personal care  products), it is imperative to educate yourself.  The Environmental Working  Group’s Skin Deep Cosmetics Database remains a wonderful resource for assessing  just how safe – or not – your favorite lipstick, mascara, or foundation might  be, and selecting the least harmful option. TheDailyGreen.com suggests actually  reading those tiny ingredient lists on every item of makeup you buy, and opting  for products with the most pronounceable names – they’re least likely to be  carcinogenic.  Be wary of makeup advertising two or three organic  ingredients, as the rest of the contents could be synthetic.  For more  resources, check out my website.

Use common sense, do your research, and spread the word. As fewer people buy  poisonous makeup, companies will be compelled to change its ways and adopt safer  practices if they want to make money. The power, as always, is in your hands –  or in this case, on your lips.

Note: Information provided herein is not intended to treat or diagnose any  health condition. As always, consult your health care provider with any  questions or health concerns.

Deirdre Imus, Founder of the site devoted to environmental health,  dienviro.org, is President and Founder of The Deirdre Imus Environmental Health  Center™ at Hackensack  University Medical Center and Co-Founder/Co-Director  of the Imus Cattle Ranch for Kids with Cancer. She is a New York Times  best-selling author and a frequent contributor to FoxNewsHealth.com, and Fox  Business Channel. Check out her website at dienviro.org. ‘e.

 

Healthy Water Drinks for Your Body

 

 

 I found this recipes on Facebook and as soon as I sent it to my family, my daughter in law Kristen send me an email that she had already made it. My 3 little grand daughters had already drank 2 pitchers of it. Sounds like it is a winner for hot summer months. Let me know if you make it and which one is your favorite.

 

 

Farmacology   Organics

 

SPRING CLEANSE ~   YOUR BODY ~ Yes another post abut water lol. But if you really want to   cleanse then DRINK, DRINK, DRINK. Here are 8 home made vitamin water recipes   to help you keep the water flowing!
 
  As a rule, you should try to avoid as much as possible industrial food and   beverages
 
  1) The classical : lemon/cucumber:
  … Mix in a pitcher: 10 cups of water + 1 cucumber and a lemon, thinly   sliced + 1/4 cup fresh finely chopped basil leaf + 1/3 of finely chopped   fresh mint leaves. Leave in the refrigerator overnight before serving.
 
  2) The granite : Strawberry/Lime or Raspberry/Lime
  Mix in a pitcher : 10 cups of water + 6 strawberries / 0r Raspberries and one   thinly sliced lime + 12 finely chopped fresh mint leaves. Leave in the   refrigerator overnight before serving.
 
  3) The digestive : Fennel/citrus
  First: infuse 1 to 3 grams of dried and crushed fennel in 150 ml of boiling   water for 5-10 minutes. Allow to cool.
  Mix in a pitcher: 10 cups of water + lemon juice (put the leftover lemon in   the mix) + a small thinly sliced orange + 12 fresh chopped mint leaves + the   infusion of fennel seeds. Leave in refrigerator overnight before serving.
 
  4) The antiOX : Blackberry/Sage
  Note that a part from the berries, sage leafs is the herb that has the   highest antioxidant content.
  Mix in a pitcher : 10 cups of water + 1 cup of blackberries that have been   very slightly crushed + 3-4 sage leaves. Leave in refrigerator overnight   before serving.
 
  5) WATERmelon : watermelon/Rosemary
  Mix in a pitcher : 10 cups of water + 1 cup of watermelon cut into cubes + 2   rosemary stems. Leave in refrigerator overnight before serving.
 
  6) The exotic : Pineapple/Mint
  Mix in a pitcher : 10 cups of water + 1 cup of pineapple cut into cubes + 12   fresh mint leaves finely chopped. Leave in the refrigerator overnight before   serving.
 
  7) The traditional : Appel/cinnamon
  Mix in a pitcher : 10 cups of water + 1 cup of apple cut into cubes + 2   cinnamon sticks + 2 teaspoon of ground cinnamon. Leave in the refrigerator   overnight before serving.
 
  8.) The zingibir : Ginger/tea
  In advance: heat 1 teaspoon of ginger in two cups of tea, let it cool down.
 
  Mix in a pitcher: 10 cups of water with two cups of the ginger tea + 4-5   pieces of fresh ginger cut into cubes. Leave in the refrigerator overnight   before serving.

Breakfast Burritos on the Go!

This week has been one of surprises for me. On Sunday night we received a call from a friend of ours who was coming to town to do some work and needed a place to hang out. Two days later I got a call from my best friend Laurie who let me know she was coming to see me for a few days and bringing her daughter Sarah with. All of these people are welcomed guests and I am thrilled that I am able to use this house, the one the Lord gave me for His Glory. Every morning has been one of thinking what can I make for breakfast using what I have here and yet be tempting for everyone.

On Tuesday I decided to make something Laurie’s husband Jim made one morning when we were at their house, Breakfast Burritos. I went in the freezer and found a package of turkey breakfast sausage, cheese in the fridge, a green and red pepper and an onion. On the shelf I found a can of potatoes from Aldi’s and went to making a breakfast that I could make ahead of time and still keep warm. First I cooked the sausage, then drained the grease, added the onion, green and red pepper and finally the potatoes until they were all cooked. Then I took the tortillas and spread some of the meat mixture on them, covered with some cheese and rolled them up. I placed them in foil and kept them warm until everyone was ready to eat.

As I was making them I thought this would be an inexpensive yet healthy thing for people to make ahead of time and put in the freezer for when you are in a hurry like taking kids to school, going to work or even Sunday mornings to church when everyone is running late. The food is so much healthier than any fast food place and what a gift to your family as they are eating something made by mom in the car. We also like them with salsa,

I am going to try and make more over the weekend and add a picture for you to see what a presentation it is.

Let me know how you like them. Until next time, enjoy everyday living!

Di

Published in: on July 23, 2009 at 3:12 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Blueberry Pie

I was going through some recipes I had and ran across this one from Andrew Weil, MD.  Seeing what I had around the house and in the freezer, I knew there were blueberries that I froze last year. I always like to have them on hand and thought I should use the ones I had and replace them with new fresh berries. This recipe is so simple and the fresh lemon juice really gives it a nice tart flavor with the sweetness of the blueberries. I also want you to know how important blueberries are to eat. Blueberries have been touted as the food with the most antioxidant potential. Their power comes from their anthocyanins, which give them their color, and loads of vitamin C. When your family eats this dessert, you can rest easily knowing you have served them something healthy and right now with blueberries in season, you can make 2!

This delightful pie is loaded with these dark-blue gems. The cooked and cooled filling is poured into a 9-inch baked pie crust.

Ingredients:
1 1/2 pounds fresh or frozen blueberries
1/2 cup light brown sugar
Juice of 1/2 fresh lemon
1 tsp cinnamon
2 tbsp cornstarch or arrowroot powder (Cornstarch can be bought at any grocery store and arrowroot can be bought at Whole Foods)
2 tbsp cold water
1 baked Pie Crust

Instructions:
1. Heat the blueberries in a saucepan over medium heat until they begin to boil. Simmer gently for 10 minutes.

2. Add the sugar, lemon juice, and cinnamon, and cook for another 2 minutes.

3. Mix the cornstarch or arrowroot well with the water, and pour mixture into the simmering blueberries while stirring. Cook and stir until the mixture becomes clear and thick. Continue to cook for 1 minute. Remove from heat and cool.

4. Spoon mixture into pie crust and refrigerate for at least 2 hours before serving.

Let me know how you like it.
Until next time, Di

Published in: on July 7, 2009 at 9:19 am  Comments (2)  
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