Uses for 4 Essential Oils

Photo: Endless uses!

Published in: on March 28, 2014 at 3:29 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , ,

Apple Cider Vinegar – A Health Tonic?

July 11, 2013 by JOHN SUMMERLY

Is Apple Cider Vinegar That Powerful of a Health Tonic? Science Says Yes

         One of the most traditional cures for almost anything is apple cider vinegar. Over the centuries, the ancient folk remedy is touted to relieve   just about any ailment you can think of including diabetes, obesity and even cancer. Here’s what science has found.

Apple cider vinegar (ACV) became well known in the U.S. in the late 1950s, when it was promoted in the best-selling book Folk Medicine: A Vermont Doctor’s Guide to Good Health by D. C. Jarvis. During the alternative medicine boom of recent years, apple cider vinegar and apple cider vinegar pills have become a popular dietary supplement.
        Unpasteurized or organic ACV contains mother of vinegar, which has a cobweb-like appearance and can make the vinegar look slightly congealed. It’s the only way apple cider vinegar should be consumed.
ACV is used in salad dressings, marinades, vinaigrettes, food preservatives, and chutneys, among other things. It is made by crushing apples and squeezing out the liquid. Bacteria and Yeast are added to the liquid to start the alcoholic fermentation process, and the sugars are turned into alcohol. In a second fermentation process, the alcohol is converted into vinegar by acetic acid-forming bacteria (acetobacter). Acetic acid and malic acid give vinegar its sour taste.
      Apple cider vinegar is purported to treat numerous diseases, health   conditions, and annoyances. To name a few, it kills  head lice, reverses aging, eases digestion, prevents flu, prevents acne, lowers blood pressure, reduces inflammation, kills fungus, regulate pH balance, dissolves kidney stones and helps relieve allergies, migraines, asthma, nausea,  heart burn and wash toxins from the body.      Can it really do all these things? You bet it can and more! But what does science say?

  • Diabetes. The effect of apple cider vinegar on blood sugar levels is   perhaps the best researched and the most promising of APV’s  health benefits. Several studies have found that   vinegar may help lower glucose levels. For instance, a study (White, A. Diabetes Care, November 2007)  of 11   people with type 2 diabetes found that taking two tablespoons of apple   cider vinegar before bed lowered glucose levels in the morning by 4%-6%. In another study from Arizona State University, subjects took a drink of 20 grams of apple cider vinegar and   40 grams of water. Those with insulin   resistance who drank the vinegar had 34% lower postprandial (after-meal)   glucose compared to controls. Vinegar may be the most cost-effective medicine in history, but most people with diabetes still aren’t taking it.
  • High Cholesterol. A 2006 study reported in Medscape General Medicine, showed evidence that ACV could lower cholesterol.  In a study published in a foreign medical journal, scientists found an   apple cider vinegar-enhanced diet may increase in HDL (good   cholesterol), and reduce levels of triglycerides. Research in rats suggests that apple-cider vinegar can help  control triglycerides and cholesterol (Journal of Agricultural and  Food Chemistry, June 22, 2011).
  • Blood Pressure and Heart Health. Another study in rats found that vinegar could lower high blood   pressure. A large observational study also found that people who ate oil   and vinegar dressing on salads five to six times a week had lower rates   of heart disease than people who didn’t. Researchers   have suggested that ‘this reduction in blood pressure may be caused by the   significant reduction in renin activity and the subsequent decrease in   angiotensin II’. Potassium in   the vinegar ‘balances sodium levels in the body, which aids in   maintaining blood pressure within healthy limits’ and ‘apple cider   vinegar also contains magnesium, a mineral that works to relax   blood vessel walls and thus lower high blood pressure’.
  • CancerA few laboratory studies have found that vinegar may be   able to kill cancer cells or slow their growth. One study found that eating vinegar was   associated with a decreased risk of esophageal cancer. Another   associated it with an increased risk of bladder cancer.   In recent trials, pectin, which can be found in ACV, has shown promise   in helping to slow the growth of cancerous cells within the prostate (http://www.news-medical.net/news/20100702/Modified-Citrus-Pectin-holds-promise-against-prostate-cancer.aspx).   In addition, apple cider vinegar’s acidity aids in detoxifying and   cleansing the digestive tract and cleaning out the colon, which supports   the health of the prostate as well.
  • Weight LossFor thousands of years, vinegar has been used for   weight loss. White vinegar (and perhaps other types) might help people   feel full. A  study (Ostman, E. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2005) of 12 people found that those who ate a piece of   bread along with small amounts of  vinegar felt fuller and more   satisfied than those who just ate the bread. A 2009 study on mice showed that consuming acetic acid (the active component in ACV), upregulates the expression of genes for   fatty acid oxidation enzymes in the liver causing a suppression in body   fat accumulation. In a double-blind experiment, obese Japanese were assigned to three different groups based on similar body weights, body mass indexes (BMI), and waist circumference. Each group drank a 500 ml drink   containing either 30ml, 15ml, or 0ml of vinegar daily for 12 weeks.   Those in the 30ml and 15ml groups had lower BMI, visceral fat area, waist circumference, serum triglyceride,   and body weight to the control group of 0ml. The 12-week weight losses   were modest: 1.2kg in the 15ml group and 1.7kg in the 30ml group.   These two groups consumed a similar number of calories to the control   group and also performed a similar amount of exercise, so the effect is   not likely to have been due to an impact on appetite or other lifestyle   changes. It was concluded that consumption of vinegar might reduce   obesity.

        Apple cider vinegar is chosen over white vinegar for many processes involving the elimination of fungus. Although they both have highly acidic properties; apple cider also   contains detoxifying qualities that will clear up other skin allergies.   No side effects have been found when treating the skin with apple cider   vinegar, making it a cost effective and safe remedy.
        Here are many other benefits of apple cider vinegar that can be applied to your lifestyle. Read the list below.

Hair: It is widely known that apple cider vinegar  can be used as a rinse for your hair after shampooing to add healthy  body and shine. Recycle an old shampoo bottle and fill it with 1/2 a   tablespoon of apple cider vinegar and a cup of cold water. Pour through your hair after shampooing several times a week.

Face: Did you know that apple cider vinegar can help regulate the pH of your skin? Dilute apple cider vinegar with two parts  water, and spread the concoction over your face with a cotton ball as a toner. You can do this at night after washing, and in the morning before you apply your moisturizer. You can also dab apple cider vinegar  directly onto age spots and leave them on overnight to lighten their color.

Hands and Feet: Are your hands and feet feeling tired and swollen after a long day? Treat yourself to a personal spa massage by rubbing apple cider vinegar onto them.

Sunburn: Suffering from a bad sunburn? Add a cup of apple cider vinegar to your bath and soak for 10 minutes.

Teeth: Did you know that apple cider vinegar can help remove stains from teeth? Rub teeth directly with apple cider vinegar and rinse out.

Aftershave: Fill a bottle with equal parts apple cider vinegar and water and shake to blend.

Detox: Add 2 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar to a 1 or 2 liter filtered water bottle. Drink this throughout the day to cleanse your body and kidneys all day long.
Drain Cleaner: Baking soda and apple cider vinegar is an amazing bubbly combination that has many uses. As a drain cleaner, sprinkle baking soda down the drain then add apple cider vinegar and let it bubble for 15 minutes, then rinse with hot water. This is a safer alternative to dangerous drain cleaners.
Digestion: A small amount of apple cider vinegar, taken just prior to a meal, will stimulate production of digestive juices.

Dandruff:  A home remedy for dandruff is to mix 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar with 1/4 cup water. The vinegar   solution is thought to restore the restore the pH balance of the scalp   and discourage the overgrowth of malassezia furfur, the yeast-like fungus thought to trigger dandruff.
Mosquito and Insect Bites:
Using as little as 1/4 teaspoon of apple cider vinegar will relieve insect bites instantly.
Stomach Aches:
Mix 1 tablespoon of organic apple cider vinegar with 12 ounces of warm water, and drink in the morning on empty stomach. Feel free to add a little honey or maple syrup.
Alkaline Acid Balance:
Some alternative practitioners recommend using apple cider vinegar to   restore alkaline acid balance. The theory behind the alkaline diet is   that our blood is slightly alkaline (with a normal pH level of between   7.35 and 7.45) and that our diet should reflect this pH level.   Proponents of the alkaline-acid theory believe that a diet high in   acid-producing foods leads to lack of energy, excessive mucous   production, infections, anxiety, irritability, headache, sore throat, nasal and sinus congestion, allergic reactions, and increased risk of  conditions such as arthritis and gout.

  John Summerly is nutritionist, herbologist, and homeopathic practitioner. He is a leader in the natural health community and consults athletes, executives and most of all parents of children on the benefits of complementary therapies for health and prevention.

Published in: on July 17, 2013 at 7:51 pm  Comments (1)  
Tags: , , ,

Is Popcorn Giving You Heart Disease?

Prevention Magazine had this article about popcorn. It is very interesting especially when you read what can be causing this. Another one of those things of us trying to stay Healthy in an Unhealthy world!

 

Is popcorn giving you heart  disease?

By Holland Taylor

Published May 12, 2013

Prevention Magazine

  • Popcorn for the movies.jpg
     

Oh, great. Just when you were starting to get a handle on your BPA exposure,  scientists uncover a new one you should worry about. 

It’s called perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)—a chemical found in things like  nonstick cookware, food wrappers, furniture, and even raincoats—and it’s been  linked to cardiovascular disease, according to a new study. 

The kicker? A full 98 percent of us have PFOA in our bloodstreams. (Protect  your body’s most important muscle with these tips to Strengthen Your Heart in 30  Days.)

Researchers from West Virginia University (WVU) School of Public Health,  Morgantown, looked at the health data of 1,200 Americans and compared their PFOA  serum levels with the incidence of heart disease. The results: The greater the  amounts of PFOA in the bloodstream, the greater the risk of cardiovascular  disease—regardless of factors like age, race, smoking, BMI, diabetes, and even  hypertension. While previous research has linked PFOA to cardiovascular disease  in animals, this is the first to look at PFOA’s heart effect on humans.

Scary? You bet. But more research needs to be done to determine the specific  relationship between PFOA and cardiovascular disease. 

“We can’t yet be certain that PFOA causes heart disease,” says lead study  author Dr. Anoop Shankar, chair of the department of epidemiology in the WVU  School of Public Health. “The two could be related in another way, like people  with cardiovascular disease tending to retain more PFOA in their blood.”  (Minimize your exposure to harsh chemicals with these 19 Bizarre Home Remedies That Really  Work.)

Still, PFOA’s track record isn’t exactly reassuring. Health watchdogs like  the Environmental Working Group—which annually puts out the Dirty Dozen Foods You Should Eat  Organic—cite  research that suggests PFOA may be a human carcinogen, and previous research has  linked the chemical to chronic kidney disease and high cholesterol in children  and adolescents. It’s also a significant source of global chemical emissions—so  much so that the EPA partnered with major manufacturers like DuPont and 3M to  form the 2010/2015 PFOA Stewardship Program, which plans to eliminate PFOAs from  the manufacturers’ products by 2015.

Until then, you can minimize your exposure to the chemical by steering clear  of two of the biggest sources: nonstick cookware and packaged foods like  microwave popcorn. According to the FDA, many popcorn bags contain especially  high levels of PFOAs. (Popcorn addict? Avoid chemicals, calories, and sodium  with these tips to prepare the perfect bowl of  popcorn at home.)

Read more:  http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/05/12/is-popcorn-giving-heart-disease/?intcmp=HPBucket#ixzz2T5B8MHFQ

Healthy Water Drinks for Your Body

 

 

 I found this recipes on Facebook and as soon as I sent it to my family, my daughter in law Kristen send me an email that she had already made it. My 3 little grand daughters had already drank 2 pitchers of it. Sounds like it is a winner for hot summer months. Let me know if you make it and which one is your favorite.

 

 

Farmacology   Organics

 

SPRING CLEANSE ~   YOUR BODY ~ Yes another post abut water lol. But if you really want to   cleanse then DRINK, DRINK, DRINK. Here are 8 home made vitamin water recipes   to help you keep the water flowing!
 
  As a rule, you should try to avoid as much as possible industrial food and   beverages
 
  1) The classical : lemon/cucumber:
  … Mix in a pitcher: 10 cups of water + 1 cucumber and a lemon, thinly   sliced + 1/4 cup fresh finely chopped basil leaf + 1/3 of finely chopped   fresh mint leaves. Leave in the refrigerator overnight before serving.
 
  2) The granite : Strawberry/Lime or Raspberry/Lime
  Mix in a pitcher : 10 cups of water + 6 strawberries / 0r Raspberries and one   thinly sliced lime + 12 finely chopped fresh mint leaves. Leave in the   refrigerator overnight before serving.
 
  3) The digestive : Fennel/citrus
  First: infuse 1 to 3 grams of dried and crushed fennel in 150 ml of boiling   water for 5-10 minutes. Allow to cool.
  Mix in a pitcher: 10 cups of water + lemon juice (put the leftover lemon in   the mix) + a small thinly sliced orange + 12 fresh chopped mint leaves + the   infusion of fennel seeds. Leave in refrigerator overnight before serving.
 
  4) The antiOX : Blackberry/Sage
  Note that a part from the berries, sage leafs is the herb that has the   highest antioxidant content.
  Mix in a pitcher : 10 cups of water + 1 cup of blackberries that have been   very slightly crushed + 3-4 sage leaves. Leave in refrigerator overnight   before serving.
 
  5) WATERmelon : watermelon/Rosemary
  Mix in a pitcher : 10 cups of water + 1 cup of watermelon cut into cubes + 2   rosemary stems. Leave in refrigerator overnight before serving.
 
  6) The exotic : Pineapple/Mint
  Mix in a pitcher : 10 cups of water + 1 cup of pineapple cut into cubes + 12   fresh mint leaves finely chopped. Leave in the refrigerator overnight before   serving.
 
  7) The traditional : Appel/cinnamon
  Mix in a pitcher : 10 cups of water + 1 cup of apple cut into cubes + 2   cinnamon sticks + 2 teaspoon of ground cinnamon. Leave in the refrigerator   overnight before serving.
 
  8.) The zingibir : Ginger/tea
  In advance: heat 1 teaspoon of ginger in two cups of tea, let it cool down.
 
  Mix in a pitcher: 10 cups of water with two cups of the ginger tea + 4-5   pieces of fresh ginger cut into cubes. Leave in the refrigerator overnight   before serving.

Trader Joe and Whole Foods say no to GMO Salmon.

Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s are part of a group of grocers that will have no part of the GMO Salmon that is scheduled to come out shortly. The genetically engineered salmon, developed by Massachusetts-based AquaBounty Technologies, has been seeking FDA approval for years. The Atlantic salmon is genetically altered with a growth-hormone gene taken from a Chinook salmon, and a genetic “on-switch” from an ocean pout, which allows the salmon to continue making growth hormones during cold weather.

You need to read the following information and help stop the FDA from allowing these types of things being done to us. Another great article for trying to stay healthy in an unhealthy world!

http://www.takepart.com/article/2013/03/20/grocers-say-no-gmo-salmon?cmpid=foodinc-fb